Pvt. Jasper Newton Fallin, Taliaferro County, Georgia

 

100 Ft River Frontage-126 Acres, Crawfordville, Taliaferro County, Georgia

Birth:  1837
Crawfordville
Taliaferro County
Georgia, USA

Taliaferro_County_Courthouse_and_flagpole_Crawfordville, Georgia

Death:  1862
Prince William County
Virginia, USA
Son of Felite “Fleet” Fallin (also spelled Fallen) and Celestia “Celia” (Huckaby) Fallin. His middle name was believed to be Newton. Jasper N. Fallin was a Confederate private who died at the Battle of Bull Run in Manassas, Virginia. Many of the friends and acquaintances from Crawfordville, Taliaferro County, Georgia died the same day. He served with the 10th Company, 48th Georgia Regiment.

He never married or had children. His widowed mother Celia (Huckaby) Fallin received his back wages as survivor benefits. His brother George Washington Fallin also served in the Civil War.

Jasper N. Fallin was a confederate private who died at the Battle of Bull Run in Manassas, Virginia. Many of the friends and acquaintances from Crawfordville, Taliaferro County, Georgia died the same day. He served with the 10th Company, 48th Georgia Regiment.

His brother George Washington Fallin also served in the Civil War, and and was wounded, captured, and died in “Point Lookout” Confederate prison in Maryland in 1865. 

PtLookout_PostCard, Maryland

 

Point Lookout is located on the east coast of the United States of America in the southern tip of Maryland in St. Mary’s County. Click on the colored U.S. map to the right to see a more detailed map locating Point Lookout. Click here to see a state map with Pt. Lookout Highlighted.

Although it is estimated that over 14,000 prisoners died at Pt. Lookout, at present only a near 3,384 are accounted for as buried in the Point Lookout cemetery. Their graves have been moved twice since the original burial. They now rest in a mass grave under an 85′ towering obelisk monument erected by the federal government. This was the first monument to Confederate soldiers! 

Prison conditions were deplorable. Rations were below minimal, causing scurvy and malnutrition. Prisoners ate rats and raw fish. It’s recorded that one hungry Rebel devoured a raw seagull that had been washed ashore. Soap skim and trash peelings were often eaten when found. Lice, disease, and chronic diarrhea often resulted in an infectious death. Prisoners were deprived of adequate clothing, and often had no shoes in winter or, only one blanket among sixteen or more housed in old, worn, torn, discarded Union sibley tents.

In the winter of 1863, 9,000 prisoners were crowded into 980 tents. Even the Point’s weather played havoc with the prisoners. Because of it’s location, it’s extremely cold with icy wind in the winter and a smoldering sun reflecting off the blinding, barren sand in summer. High water often flooded the tents in the camp area, resulting in knee deep mud. The undrained marshes bred mosquitoes. Malaria, typhoid fever and smallpox was common. The brackish water supply was contaminated by unsanitary camp conditions. There was a deadline about 10′ from the approx. 14′ wooden parapet wall. Anyone caught crossing this line, even to peek through the fence, was shot. Prisoners were also randomly shot by the guards during the night as they slept, or if they called out from pain. source:  Point Lookout Confederate Prison

Family links:
 Parents:
  Felite Fallin (1786 – 1847)
  Celestia Huckaby Fallin (1795 – 1879)
 
 Siblings:
  Dovie Fallin Hunt (1827 – 1907)
  George Washington Fallin (1832 – 1865)

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Burial:
Groveton Confederate Cemetery
Groveton
Prince William County
Virginia, USA
GROVETON CONFEDERATE CEMETERY
Created by: TEXAS TUDORS
Record added: Nov 25, 2015
Find A Grave Memorial# 155371085OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
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